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Posts Tagged ‘work’

Quote of the day!

November 5, 2009 Leave a comment

“Coffee, tea … or me?”

This was found in an article in the Toronto Star, about feminism, as well as a little history lesson. Apparently, if women at all wanted to travel “back then”, they had to become “stewardesses”, and that’s what they would have to say.

Wow. Just, wow.

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Did anyone think otherwise?

January 2, 2008 Leave a comment

Women, yet again, get the shitty end of the stick. New figures estimate that it takes women 16 years to pay off their educational debt, while it only takes men 11 years. I wonder why.

Women take longer to pay off bills because of the pay gap – estimated to be up to 20% – and because they are more likely to take time out to look after children.

But…I think it has more to do with the pay gap. Of course becoming a stay-at-home-mother might have a little to do with it, but these women, in the UK at least, get paid maternity leave.

Kat Stark, the women’s officer for the National Union of Students, retaliated about the notion that women are taking longer to pay their debt because they are taking time off to have children, by saying,

Women are taking longer than men to pay off their student loans because they are paid less, not because they are taking time off to have children. Within three years of graduating, over 40% of men are earning over £25,000, compared to just over a quarter of women. The pay gap is not a new problem – the government knew when it introduced the tuition fees system that female graduates would end up saddled with debt to a worse extent than their male counterparts. In the run-up to the 2009 review of higher education funding, the government should consider whether they wish to perpetuate this injustice.

Of course, others said that employers give equal pay, based on education and skills. But it’s no secret that the pay gap is still very much a part of our society. Either way, this is just one more thing to add to the “Crappy Situations for Women” list.

The 50 women to watch for 2007

November 19, 2007 Leave a comment

The Wall Street Journal has made a list of of the 50 women who have made it to vice president or higher in their particular corporations. The article is quick to point out though that only 16.4% of Fortune 500 corporate-officer jobs are held by women. Not too much.

That is an increase of just 0.7 percentage point from 2002, according to a survey by Catalyst, the New York research group. Similarly, they comprise just one-sixth of corporate directors.

But the article thinks it’s very promising for women and this is a step in the right direction. It definitely is a step in the right direction. A lot of changes are unfortunately very slow, and this is one of them. As long as more and more women are getting into those corporate jobs, it’s a good sign. And hopefully, as the article points out, it will only encourage other women to go for those jobs and be successful there!

Categories: jobs, women, work Tags: , ,

Feminism and the media

November 9, 2007 Leave a comment

A great piece over at Alternet by L.S. Kim, is talking about the need for feminist media.

Thirty-five years ago, as the second wave of the 20th-century U.S. feminist movement burst into action, women were all but shut out of newsrooms, press clubs, editorial boards and broadcasting booths. Women did the research; men got the bylines. Feminists were determined to be included, and to change the media. They wanted to counter and correct the mainstream news — and start their own press(es).

Now, in 2007, there are females who are writing the stories and getting their vioces heard through a variety of media, but…

Despite women’s advancements, in some areas of news journalism they continue to lag way behind. Women are still rarely asked to comment as experts on serious events, trends or policies: They comprise less than one in four newspaper opinion writers. In radio, women program less than 11 percent of all stations, and just four of Radio Ink magazine’s 40 “Most Powerful People in Radio” are women. Even in the more liberated blogosphere, only a handful of Technorati’s 100 most-visited blogs include women writers, among them the Huffington Post and Gawker.

So, what’s going on here? It’s obvious that there isn’t equality in the media world, but there seems to be less and less emphasis on women’s rights and feminism. There’s no equality here and women’s voices are still a struggle to be heard.

Kim concludes with saying we shouldn’t be satisfied with the “nonthreatening, depoliticized feminism proffered by the mass media.” I agree! Let’s actually make a change!

Women are simply “demanding and pushy”

November 1, 2007 Leave a comment

As opposed to the man’s “assertive” in the workplace, women are still being looked at as “demanding and pushy”.

An experiment was done to see how employers would react differently to a man and woman that have the same resume, same interview answers, and are going for the same job.

The results: The volunteers were 30 percent less likely to hire the woman than the man. The reason: She’s too demanding and pushy, even though she said exactly the same things as her male counterpart.

Hmm…interesting. Clear gender bias and sexism. The article goes on to say that the employers bias comes from nature or nuture, or little bit of both. It is still true that perceptions towards women in the workplace aren’t good. She’s pushy, demanding, a bitch, and she must be a slut too if she’s worked her way up the corporate ladder!

So, why is this sexism still occurring? Women can be and are just as good workers, or better, than their male counterparts. Why do employers still get away with this gender bias? Oh how the world is cruel and unfair.

Categories: men, sexism, women, work Tags: , , ,

Does fullfillment come from men and children?

October 31, 2007 2 comments

There is an interesting article debate over at Huffington Post. It’s worth the read, by the way!

The first article, by the founder of thestateof.com said that fullfillment most definitely comes from men and children for women. Some highlights…

Feminism has destabilized society by undermining heterosexuality and the family. This perverse assault on gender difference is disguised as an act of “defense” of women’s’ and homosexuals’ “right” to be single and childless. Women have been duped into seeking “power” and “independence” (aloneness) through climbing the mirage of the corporate ladder. What women really want is power expressed as male love.

Without a child to care for, a woman often becomes frustrated, bitter and distracted. She often uses the “success” of her “career” (which is simply a glorified word for “job”) as a replacement for the void of the missing child.

Ok, some of my points now. First of all, do women and homosexuals not have a right to remain childless or single? No law is saying that anyone is obliged to have children or be in a couple, married or cohabiting. And guess what? “Independence” is not aloneness. It’s being able to not have to depend on another person, which a life skill that everyone should have. At times, we are able, or can choose to rely on people, because it would be hell if we couldn’t, but being independent does not mean “aloneness”. Oh, and that power expressed as male love? Give me a break. Sure, we’d all love some love, but that’s not the only thing that we can have for fullfillment!

Also…some women honestly do not want child and are completely happy with their pure careers. There is nothing wrong with this. Some women are not nurturers. For example, my father was and is the nuturer, or “mother role”, in the family, although currently he does make more money. While my mother is much more cold and distant, and takes much pride in her career choices. In the end, my father would be more devastated if he didn’t have a child than my mother. Why are people so keen to generalize women and men into one category?

The other article, by Rebecca Thorman, takes the other side of the argument.

Whether we check off men, children, career, or all of the above, the fact is that we have a choice, and what fulfills and limits us is not created by society and media, but increasingly our own desires.

The kind of woman who is a compassionate alpha. The Generation Y woman has leadership and strength, and promotes community and empathy. We don’t dismiss motherhood, but embrace our strengths and use those to change the workplace, reaping from it a greater sense of fulfillment than ever before. It is not a coincidence that at a time when power-hungry hierarchies are being broken down, women are leading and infiltrating the workplace. It is our skills and talents that have created such an influential shift.

I’ll just say that I obviously agree with the second article more. And just for the record, I do want some male lovin’, some kids, but I’m not going to give up my career for having that. Obvious sacrifice have to be made by both men and women when children come into the picture, and those sacrifices are individual choices and worked out in a personal setting. No overgeneralizing should still be occurring!

Second generation daughters prospering…kinda, not really

October 31, 2007 Leave a comment

Accoring to Statistics Canada, daughters of immigrants are more likely to prosper than sons of immigrants. And they are even earning more than daughters of Canadian-born parents.

Taking education levels into account, Dr. Palameta found that young women with two immigrant parents earned wages about 15 per cent higher than did young women with Canadian-born parents.

But…

Jeffrey Reitz, an immigration expert and professor of sociology at the University of Toronto, cautions against thinking second-generation women are doing particularly well, though.

He says most analyses of minority women show greater gains in earning because these women are compared with a broader group of other women, who still experience lower wages and salaries than men.

But for men, the comparison is with “mainstream men who are the best paid people in the work force – they’re the ones monopolizing all the best jobs.”

When I was reading the beginning of the article, I was thinking “Yeah, I’m not surpried. My university is a white minority and many, many of population are 2nd generation Canadians”. But then reading on made me realize that women are still not prospering, because this study didn’t even compare against men’s income and job status. Ridiculous. It’s definitely a deceptive study. When people will see this, they’ll thing “Oh great! This is more equality for women!”, when really, there’s no equality here. Women are still making comparatively less than men…and this is one reason why feminism still has to exist. Sad.