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Archive for January, 2008

Another instance of celebrating boys over girls

January 23, 2008 Leave a comment

The border town of Blaine, Washington has been found to have a clinic called “Koala Labs” that attracts Indo-Canadians (and I’m sure many other people as well) to see what the sex of their baby is at 3 months into the pregnancy, so a couple will know earlier if they will be getting an abortion or not.

Liberal MP Ujjah Dosanjh drew attention to the clinic this week, after an Indo-Canadian man, Lakhvinder Kahlon, of North Delta, B.C., was charged with killing his two-year-old daughter. Mr. Dosanjh denounced the cultural tradition of celebrating boys over girls, and said South Asian families from Vancouver go to clinics in Blaine in order to find out a fetus’s gender early enough in a pregnancy to permit an abortion.

Very sad. When is this going to end?

Um, not to sound “man-hating,” but…

January 22, 2008 Leave a comment

Alternet has a sweet piece called “If Men Could Get Pregnant, Abortion Would be a Sacrament.

It’s not really about men too much, but just a little history of abortion and those rights. Check it out!

Applauding anti-abortion activists? Ugh.

January 22, 2008 3 comments

That’s what’s happening in Washington! Bush is thanking these people for their continuous work and “calling for continued vigilance.” Are we glad that Bush isn’t going to be the President of the United States of America much longer? Yes infinity.

“We’re heartened by the news that the number of abortions is declining, but the most recent data reports that more than one in five pregnancies end in abortion. America is better than this, so we will continue to work for a culture of life,” Bush said.

So, Bush, are you saying that everyone who gets an abortion is not suited for America and essentially a “bad” person? I cannot express my frustration into words.

I really think I’ve said it before, and I’ll say it again – there is no need for anti-abortion activists. Firstly, anti-abortion activists are not set out to improve the quality of life for everyone. Secondly, they do not have to get abortions. Everyone can respect that. But they need to respect the decisions of other women who do choose to have an abortion, which is probably for a variety of reasons. Do people not understand that? Are they that ignorant?

Video on why we love Roe vs. Wade!

January 22, 2008 1 comment

This is an awesome video on why so many people (women and men alike!) loooove Roe vs. Wade and support choice.

My personal stance

January 22, 2008 1 comment

Why is a woman’s choice so important to me? Because it acknowledges that she’s a human being.

When she is able to make reproductive choices, it acknowledges that she can and is able to make decisions on her own accord. She’s no one’s puppet. She’s in control of her own life, doing what she feels or knows is best. When that choice is taken away from her, it’s sending a message that women are not capable to make these decisions; that the middle-aged men in suits are better at knowing a woman’s body than a woman knowing her own.

When the choice is taken away, it shows that women really are second-class citizens, because a fetus is all of a sudden more important than her grown, developed human citizenry. Her life should be more important.

Some of you may agree with me strongly, and some of your might strongly agree with me. Leave your own thoughts behind about why (or why not) a woman’s choice is so important to you.

Happy Blog for Choice day!

January 22, 2008 Leave a comment

Today all the blogs around the web (ok, not ALL, but you get it!) are talking about why they support a woman’s choice in her reproduction rights. Personally, I will be telling you why I feel this way, and I will be doing news stories that are pertaining to this.

It’s all about reproductive rights today! Stay tuned!

On politics and misogyny

January 21, 2008 3 comments

Now this is a New York Times column that I can heart and appreciate. Bob Herbert has written a great column about politics and misogyny. It was written before the Nevada Primary, so he talks about the “misogyny capital of America” a fair amount. And of course, Clinton won. Ironic? Who knows! Anyway, he has some really good points about misogyny in general. He points out that all of a sudden, when Clinton wins a primary, gender is all the talk in the media…but he’s pretty much asking, “Why haven’t we been talking about this all along? Misogyny is everywhere.”

Its forms are limitless. Hard-core pornography is a multibillion-dollar business, having spread far beyond the stereotyped raincoat crowd to anyone with a laptop and a password. Crowds of crazed photographers risk life and limb to get shots of Paris Hilton or Britney Spears without their underwear. At New York Jets home games, men regularly gather at Gate D to urge female fans to expose themselves.

He says that misogyny is a true pastime for most men. I would have to agree with that. Since it’s not something that is talk about, it’s easy for people to think that men aren’t really being misogynists when their looking and getting off to porn.

Unfortunately, some of these things have become so “normal” in our society that we simply dismiss all of this. And relating this all to politics, he wonders how the candidates feel about this.

To what extent are the candidates of either party concerned about these matters? Do they have any sense of how extensive and debilitating the mistreatment of women and girls really is?

I’m not sure. I doubt the men in the campaign understand, just because they have not personally experienced it. Nonetheless, Bob Herbert obviously understands, and he’s no woman. But many times, women don’t even understand their own mistreatment because this is the misogyny that they’ve grown up with and don’t think anything of it. So I would argue that Hillary would understand more so, because she’s going through it all right now. However, are these presidential candidates going to change things for women and girls and try to help end the misogyny towards them? I suppose we’ll have to wait and see.

Categories: misogyny, politics Tags: ,