Home > daughters, fathers, murder, religion > Update on “Muder over hijab?”

Update on “Muder over hijab?”

This story has apparently sparked a wildfire across North America, and I imagine maybe further than that. The Toronto Star states that,

On Facebook, at least 11 groups have surfaced in response, with more than 5,000 members, some ranting, some pontificating and others spewing racial epithets.

On YouTube, at least 11 videos, viewed in total more than 16,000 times, have been posted. One website, somalinet.com, published a story on Parvez’s death and included a poll about whether the father was justified in the alleged killing. As of last night, five of the 19 who responded agreed.

The girl who was murdered, Aqsa Parvez, is going to be buried tomorrow and over 1,000 people are expected to show up. This really is huge. It’s one thing when a teenager dies, but it’s a completely different thing when their parent kills them. And of course, with all the Islamophobia in the world right now, it’s even a bigger deal.

An Islamic leader spoke to the press yesterday about the situation and stated that “parents fail and bring shame upon themselves if a child chooses to abandon holy writings and not wear the hijab.” As well,

“It is their duty to convince their kids that this part of their culture,” he said. However, he said Muslims “categorically” denounce acts of murder. “This is not allowed in Islam, totally.”

I really don’t like that statement. I mean, yes, he’s saying that murder is not allowed in Islam, yet at the same time he’s defending the father. I can understand a parent wanting certain things for their children, but parents must respect their children’s choices if they choose another way.

Finally, at the end of this article, Shaila Kibria, who works on human right issues within the Muslim community, said that this is a greater, greater issue than the hijab, which is something that I stated in my previous post about this issue.

“It’s so controversial because there are so many interpretations about whether the hijab is a requirement in Islam,” said the 32-year-old who chooses to wear the hijab. “But the hijab and religion are not the real issues. What this poor girl went through, which is domestic violence and violence against women, isn’t being recognized; what’s being recognized is the hijab.”

If the discussion remains centred on the issue of the hijab, Kibria said she fears Muslim men won’t take responsibility for the “extremist religious patriarchy” that exists within their community.

I completely agree with her, and hopefully more will see this. This heinous violent act has unfortunately been covered up by the hijab, and not taken for what it really is.

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  1. December 15, 2007 at 11:24 am

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